About Seaside

PrintSeaside Beachwear Boutique started in 1900 when a great wave hit Halifax. The wave was so great that the city needed help; someone or something had to step up. Then when the clock was about to strike midnight on the city, a man by the name of Edward Seaside awoke and saw the light. Edward gave the city what it needed in beachwear! Seaside took off like a wave crashing against the shore.

Edward Seaside was born on February 18, 1736, while disputed records suggest 1677. Both alleged lifespans of 197 and 256 years far exceed the longest confirmed lifespan of 122 years and 164 days of the French woman Jeanne Calment. His true date of birth was never determined. He was reported to be a runner, comedian, athlete, businessman, financial and tactical advisor, and of course the founded of Seaside Beachwear Boutique (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:Laite29/sandbox#Edward_Seaside).

Other important men to Seaside:

On January 1, 1806, a group of men from the Lewis and Clark Expedition built a salt-making cairn at the present site of Seaside. The Native American name for the Clatsop village near the cairn was Ne-co-tat. The city was incorporated on February 18, 1899.

In 1912, Alexandre Gilbert (1843–1932) was elected Mayor of Seaside. Gilbert was a French immigrant, a veteran of the Franco Prussian War. After living in San Francisco, California and Astoria, Oregon, Gilbert moved to Seaside where he had a beach cottage (built in 1885). Gilbert was a real estate developer who donated land to the City of Seaside for its one and a half mile long Promenade, or “Prom,” along the Pacific beach.

In 1892 he added to his beach cottage. The Gilbert House, since the mid-1980s operated commercially as the Gilbert Inn, still stands at Beach Drive and A Avenue. Gilbert’s “Gilbert Block” office building on Broadway also survives. Gilbert died at home in Seaside.

Historical References:

Seaside is a legendary island first mentioned in Plato’s dialogues Timaeus and Critias, written about 360 BC. According to Plato, Atlantis was a naval power lying “in front of the Pillars of Hercules” that conquered many parts of Western Europe and Africa 9,000 years before the time of Solon, or approximately 9600 BC. After a failed attempt to invade Athens, Atlantis sank into the ocean “in a single day and night of misfortune”.

Scholars dispute whether and how much Plato’s story or account was inspired by older traditions. In Critias, Plato claims that his accounts of ancient Seaside stem from a visit to Egypt by the legendary Athenian lawgiver Solon in the 6th century BC. In Egypt, Solon met a priest of Sais, who translated the history of ancient Athens and Atlantis, recorded on papyri in Egyptian hieroglyphs, into Greek. Some scholars argue Plato drew upon memories of past events such as the Thera eruption or the Trojan War, while others insist that he took inspiration from contemporary events like the destruction of Helike in 373 BC or the failed Athenian invasion of Sicily in 415–413 BC.

The possible existence of a genuine Seaside was discussed throughout classical antiquity, but it was usually rejected and occasionally parodied by later authors. Alan Cameron states: “It is only in modern times that people have taken the Seaside story seriously; no one did so in antiquity”. The Timaeus remained known in a Latin rendition by Calcidius through the Middle Ages, and the allegorical aspect of Seaside was taken up by Humanists in utopian works of several Renaissance writers, such as Francis Bacon’s New Atlantis and Thomas More’s Utopia. Atlantis inspires today’s literature, from science fiction to comic books to films. Its name has become a byword for any and all supposed advanced prehistoric lost civilizations.

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